Consumer Reports Says to Avoid These Goodyear Tires on Your RV

When driving an RV weighing in at 30,000 lbs, having a tire blowout is the last thing you’d want to happen. And considering that rubber is the only thing keeping your vehicle on the road, tires may be the most important piece of your car. That’s why Consumer Reports recommends avoiding the Goodyear G159 RV tires at all costs. Linked to more accidents than any other tire, if you want a safe trip, you’d better find some different rubber.

Goodyear Logo On Tire
Goodyear Logo On Tire | Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Goodyear G159 RV tires have been linked to hundreds of crashes

The problem with the Goodyear G159 RV tires is that they were never built for highway speeds. Unfortunately, the highway is where RVs spend most of their lives, second only to sitting in park at an RV campground. According to Consumer Reports, at highway speeds the rubber heats up, causing “tread separation.” Or, in layman’s terms, a blowout.

However, what’s more concerning is that these tires have been discontinued for almost 20 years. With production lasting from 1996 to 2003, some of these tires could be 25 years old. Yet despite numerous deadly blowouts across the country, the tire has never been recalled. But why?

Why these RV tires are still on the road?

Goodyear Logo Peeking Through Pile Of Tires
Goodyear Logo Peeking Through Pile Of Tires | Denis Charlet/AFP via Getty Images

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Goodyear has flat out denied the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s claims that the tires are unsafe. Instead, they pinned the blame on user error, claiming that customers underinflated the tires or overloaded the RV.

Though, part of that “user error” agenda is somewhat accurate. Motorhomes aren’t typically used full time, nor are they constantly driving. They often sit, losing air and creating spots where the tires are being pressed against the pavement. This can weaken the overall structure of a tire, and increase the chance of a tire popping.

The good news is that, by now, most of these Goodyear G159 tires have “aged out.” Every tire has a set lifespan in years, like an expiration date, and many of these tires are too old to use. But that doesn’t mean they’re all gone. So if you’re looking at used RVs, be sure they’ve got quality tires.

What are the best RV tires?

RV Driving Towards Mountains
RV Driving Towards Mountains | Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics via Getty Images

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You’ll want to do your research to make sure you find the right tire for your RV, depending on what class of RV it is. But there are plenty of good options on the market that can handle being in park for extended periods of time, and won’t overheat while you’re on the highway.

If you’re willing to give Goodyear another chance, the Wrangler lineup could be an excellent selection for your RV. Their purposes vary, as while the Wrangler Fortitude HT All-Season tire is decent all around, but struggles in the snow, the Wrangler Silent Armor Pro can handle rougher terrain and weather.

Whether you go on RV adventures every month, every weekend, or every day, there’s no denying the importance of good RV tires. Without them, your journey will topple to an end (literally), and could cause irreparable damages. So before setting out, be sure you’ve got the right rubber.

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